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The following are the most popular business diagrams on our site:

Client experience analysis

Use the below diagram to analyze client experience through a variety of variables, including wait times, staff friendliness, information provided and fulfillment of the client requests. This is a good way to compare CX among a number of companies in a single view

View a PowerPoint (ppt) slide of this Client experience analysis diagram

Process efficiency analysis

Process efficiency analysis chart below helps one compare business processes in terms of their efficiency. This analysis includes several variables such as account quality (e.g. measured in defects), speed, cost and people resources required in the process.

View a PowerPoint (ppt) slide of this Process efficiency analysis diagram

User experience ux analysis

Compare user experience using the below ux analysis diagram. This makes for a great slide and helps you analyze performance of the various websites and / or systems from ux perspective. It uses the following variables ease of use (e.g. ease of navigation), features, loading times and design.

View a PowerPoint (ppt) slide of this User experience ux analysis diagram

Implementation planning

The below implementation plan diagram depicts a plan of action and relevant dependencies for a typical project. Implementation planning starts with identifying the big buckets of work, such as people, process, technology and coming up with key activities. Mapping these implementation activities in the timeline, identifying key milestones and dependencies are all key components of a typical implementation plan.

View a PowerPoint (ppt) slide of this Implementation planning diagram

Implementation roadmap

Implementation roadmap below depicts a plan of action to deliver on a project or a certain capability. Roadmap usually takes into an account a more long term view as compared to the typical project. Technology roadmaps take into account various tech dependencies and may require a more strategic architecture view.

View a PowerPoint (ppt) slide of this Implementation roadmap diagram

Strategic Roadmap Example by Quarter

A strategy roadmap describes the what and the why. An execution plan describes the how. A strategy roadmap is not a visual Gantt chart of activities with start dates and end dates. It describes what the organization must change, and why the changes are required, in order to achieve the strategic vision.

A powerful format and 3-step process to create your own 1-page quarterly strategic action plan to grow your company. As a leader of your company, you know it’s your job to keep your team and the company focused on the right things.

Creating Your One-Page Quarterly Strategic Action Plan in Three Simple Steps 1. Pick Your Three “Focus Areas” for the Quarter Your Focus Areas are the most important areas for your business to spotlight during the coming quarter. Sure, you’ll still have to take care of your company’s day-to-day operational needs.

Strategic Roadmap Example by Quarter

Communication Plan

You need a communication plan. A communication plan is your road map for getting your message delivered to your audience. It’s an essential tool for ensuring your organization sends a clear, specific message with measurable results.

Choose your target audiences. 3. Design your key messages. 4. Select your communication methods. 5. Plan for two-way communication. 6. Establish your time frame. 7. Draft a budget. 8. Implement the plan. 9. Monitor the results and look for ways to improve.

You need a communication plan. A communication plan is your road map for getting your message delivered to your audience. It’s an essential tool for ensuring your organization sends a clear, specific message with measurable results. Writing a communication plan can be time-consuming. Here are six steps that will help you create an effective …

Communication Plan

Ishikawa Diagram

Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams created by Kaoru Ishikawa that show the causes of a specific event. Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are product design and quality

Identifies Root Cause: To understand the root of the problem or say the ultimate cause of the issue, Ishikawa diagram is of great significance. Establishes Cause and Effect Relationship: It is an appropriate way of stating the relation between what had happened and why did it happened.

Ishikawa diagram. Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams created by Kaoru Ishikawa that show the causes of a specific event. Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are product design and quality defect prevention to identify potential factors…

Ishikawa Diagram

SIPOC diagram

A SIPOC diagram is a form of process mapping. Process mapping is a term used to describe the task of putting a project’s goals and, in some cases, detailed steps on how those goals will be accomplished.

The SIPOC (R) will also help the team to understand who their Customers are and what are their Requirements The SIPOC (R) helps us break down our process into External Inputs and their Suppliers; Process Steps; and Outputs, Customers and their Requirements. This diagram allows us to see the process from the 30,000 foot view.

The SIPOC (R) helps us break down our process into External Inputs and their Suppliers; Process Steps; and Outputs, Customers and their Requirements. This diagram allows us to see the process from the 30,000 foot view. I like to use the example of Mowing a Lawn to describe the Diagram above. The Scope of “The Process” is inside of the box.

SIPOC diagram

Service Design Process

Service design is a process where designers create sustainable solutions and optimal experiences for both customers in unique contexts and any service providers involved. Designers break services into sections and adapt fine-tuned solutions to suit all users’ needs in context—based on actors, location and other factors.

“Sequential” means that service need to be logically, rhythmically and visually displayed. Service design is a dynamic process of a period of time. The timeline is important for customers in the service system.

It can be used to improve an existing service or to create a new service from scratch. In order to adapt to service design, a UX designer will need to understand the basic principles of service design thinking and be able to focus on them when creating services.

Service Design Process

Roadmap Example

The visual display of a roadmap is generally consistent, however. Here is a basic product roadmap example: In this post, we discuss in more detail the following three variations of a product roadmap example: Single Product Roadmap. Multiple Product Roadmap. Agile/Sprint Roadmap.

This free roadmap template provides sample layouts with editable illustrations that can help you generate your own roadmap for a product. The slide backgrounds are quite colorful and come with eye-catching diagrams that can be edited to enter your own information to quickly generate a professional product roadmap. 4.

Creating a product roadmap should be a continuous process throughout the lifecycle of a product. You should collect requirements and features from a variety of sources, including customers, partners, sales, support, management, engineering, operations, and product management.

Roadmap Example

Stanford Design Thinking Process

The Stanford d.school is a place where people use design to develop their own creative potential. The five stages of Design Thinking, according to d.school, are as follows: Empathise, Define, Ideate, Prototype, and Test. 1. Empathize.

In essence, the Design Thinking process is iterative, flexible and focused on collaboration between designers and users, with an emphasis on bringing ideas to life based on how real users think, feel and behave. Design Thinking tackles complex problems by:

We will focus on the five-stage Design Thinking model proposed by the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school). d.school is the leading university when it comes to teaching Design Thinking. The five stages of Design Thinking, according to d.school, are as follows: Empathise,…

Stanford Design Thinking Process

Brand Plan 3 Ps Purpose Promise Potential

I’ve used this 3 P’s structure of Product, Perspective and Purpose to gain consensus and build brands at a diverse set of companies. It is my way to use concepts every business person can relate to, yet remain true to my belief that a corporate brand impacts the business. So I guess I kept the dog bone, but found a new trick–not a bad compromise.

If the customer experience doesn’t match the brand promise, the value of your brand is weakened. An example of a brand promise not living up to expectations comes from Ford Motor Company. During the 1980s, Ford’s brand promise was “Quality is Job 1.” However, owners of Ford’s vehicles were not impressed as they routinely spent money on repairs.

A Brand Promise Is: Credible If the customer experience doesn’t match the brand promise, the value of your brand is weakened. An example of a brand promise not living up to expectations comes from Ford Motor Company. During the 1980s, Ford’s brand promise was “Quality is Job 1.”

Brand Plan 3 Ps Purpose Promise Potential

SIPOC Process Example

Example # 1 – Manufacturing. Here is a SIPOC for an armature winding process (this SIPOC was made with the Microsoft Word template found on the templates page). Note that this SIPOC is very high level (always the best place to start), and would be of value to new employees, customers, or leadership team members who are unfamiliar with the process.

Learn how to create SIPOC for your project in 7 simple steps. SIPOC stands for Suppliers, Inputs, Process, Outputs and Customers. This is designed to be a high level process view with 6-7 process steps displayed. This helps the team to view the process together with all the important components.

There is no fixed template for SIPOC and the easiest is the one shown above in tabular form. The tabular SIPOC can be created in Excel/Word or PPT very easily. You can also check below templates for your SIPOC. In one of them the process steps are shown separately, which is perfectly fine and many SIPOCs are created that way.

SIPOC Process Example

Gemba

Genba (ç¾å ´, also romanized as gemba) is a Japanese term meaning “the actual place”. Japanese detectives call the crime scene genba, and Japanese TV reporters may refer to themselves as reporting from genba. In business, genba refers to the place where value is created; in manufacturing the genba is the factory floor.

Gemba walk. Gemba walks denote the action of going to see the actual process, understand the work, ask questions, and learn. It is also known as one fundamental part of Lean management philosophy.

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