Ishikawa Diagram

Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams created by Kaoru Ishikawa that show the causes of a specific event. Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are product design and quality

Identifies Root Cause: To understand the root of the problem or say the ultimate cause of the issue, Ishikawa diagram is of great significance. Establishes Cause and Effect Relationship: It is an appropriate way of stating the relation between what had happened and why did it happened.

Ishikawa diagram. Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams created by Kaoru Ishikawa that show the causes of a specific event. Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are product design and quality defect prevention to identify potential factors…

Ishikawa Diagram

SIPOC diagram

A SIPOC diagram is a form of process mapping. Process mapping is a term used to describe the task of putting a project’s goals and, in some cases, detailed steps on how those goals will be accomplished.

The SIPOC (R) will also help the team to understand who their Customers are and what are their Requirements The SIPOC (R) helps us break down our process into External Inputs and their Suppliers; Process Steps; and Outputs, Customers and their Requirements. This diagram allows us to see the process from the 30,000 foot view.

The SIPOC (R) helps us break down our process into External Inputs and their Suppliers; Process Steps; and Outputs, Customers and their Requirements. This diagram allows us to see the process from the 30,000 foot view. I like to use the example of Mowing a Lawn to describe the Diagram above. The Scope of “The Process” is inside of the box.

SIPOC diagram

Service Design Process

Service design is a process where designers create sustainable solutions and optimal experiences for both customers in unique contexts and any service providers involved. Designers break services into sections and adapt fine-tuned solutions to suit all users’ needs in context—based on actors, location and other factors.

“Sequential” means that service need to be logically, rhythmically and visually displayed. Service design is a dynamic process of a period of time. The timeline is important for customers in the service system.

It can be used to improve an existing service or to create a new service from scratch. In order to adapt to service design, a UX designer will need to understand the basic principles of service design thinking and be able to focus on them when creating services.

Service Design Process

Roadmap Example

The visual display of a roadmap is generally consistent, however. Here is a basic product roadmap example: In this post, we discuss in more detail the following three variations of a product roadmap example: Single Product Roadmap. Multiple Product Roadmap. Agile/Sprint Roadmap.

This free roadmap template provides sample layouts with editable illustrations that can help you generate your own roadmap for a product. The slide backgrounds are quite colorful and come with eye-catching diagrams that can be edited to enter your own information to quickly generate a professional product roadmap. 4.

Creating a product roadmap should be a continuous process throughout the lifecycle of a product. You should collect requirements and features from a variety of sources, including customers, partners, sales, support, management, engineering, operations, and product management.

Roadmap Example

Stanford Design Thinking Process

The Stanford d.school is a place where people use design to develop their own creative potential. The five stages of Design Thinking, according to d.school, are as follows: Empathise, Define, Ideate, Prototype, and Test. 1. Empathize.

In essence, the Design Thinking process is iterative, flexible and focused on collaboration between designers and users, with an emphasis on bringing ideas to life based on how real users think, feel and behave. Design Thinking tackles complex problems by:

We will focus on the five-stage Design Thinking model proposed by the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school). d.school is the leading university when it comes to teaching Design Thinking. The five stages of Design Thinking, according to d.school, are as follows: Empathise,…

Stanford Design Thinking Process

Brand Plan 3 Ps Purpose Promise Potential

I’ve used this 3 P’s structure of Product, Perspective and Purpose to gain consensus and build brands at a diverse set of companies. It is my way to use concepts every business person can relate to, yet remain true to my belief that a corporate brand impacts the business. So I guess I kept the dog bone, but found a new trick–not a bad compromise.

If the customer experience doesn’t match the brand promise, the value of your brand is weakened. An example of a brand promise not living up to expectations comes from Ford Motor Company. During the 1980s, Ford’s brand promise was “Quality is Job 1.” However, owners of Ford’s vehicles were not impressed as they routinely spent money on repairs.

A Brand Promise Is: Credible If the customer experience doesn’t match the brand promise, the value of your brand is weakened. An example of a brand promise not living up to expectations comes from Ford Motor Company. During the 1980s, Ford’s brand promise was “Quality is Job 1.”

Brand Plan 3 Ps Purpose Promise Potential

SIPOC Process Example

Example # 1 – Manufacturing. Here is a SIPOC for an armature winding process (this SIPOC was made with the Microsoft Word template found on the templates page). Note that this SIPOC is very high level (always the best place to start), and would be of value to new employees, customers, or leadership team members who are unfamiliar with the process.

Learn how to create SIPOC for your project in 7 simple steps. SIPOC stands for Suppliers, Inputs, Process, Outputs and Customers. This is designed to be a high level process view with 6-7 process steps displayed. This helps the team to view the process together with all the important components.

There is no fixed template for SIPOC and the easiest is the one shown above in tabular form. The tabular SIPOC can be created in Excel/Word or PPT very easily. You can also check below templates for your SIPOC. In one of them the process steps are shown separately, which is perfectly fine and many SIPOCs are created that way.

SIPOC Process Example

Gemba

Genba (ç¾å ´, also romanized as gemba) is a Japanese term meaning “the actual place”. Japanese detectives call the crime scene genba, and Japanese TV reporters may refer to themselves as reporting from genba. In business, genba refers to the place where value is created; in manufacturing the genba is the factory floor.

Gemba walk. Gemba walks denote the action of going to see the actual process, understand the work, ask questions, and learn. It is also known as one fundamental part of Lean management philosophy.

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Gemba

Change Management Tools

Change managers should find a project management tool that fits their style and their organization. Some are simpler than others. Trello, for instance, is a straightforward task management tool. It is useful for establishing a process pipeline, communicating with team members, and organizing workflows.

But using the following change management tools and techniques in developing an approach that closely accounts for the needs of your organization will ensure a successful transition. Try WalkMe’s step-by-step guidance platform to make change management smooth and simple. 1. Flowcharting 2. Metrics and Data Collection 3. Force Field Analysis 4.

Benefits of Change Management Software: 1 Change management tools help in keeping version control. 2 Prevents modification for the same thing by more than one person. 3 Track the changes made. 4 Allows to back out the changes. More …

Change Management Tools

RACI Chart

The following RACI chart was made by a plant manager and his staff for a parking lot repaving project – The first three lines in the above RACI chart illustrate each of the R, A, C, and I definitions: The first task is to identify outside contractors to quote on the job.

Enter all project roles or team member names across the top row. List all tasks, milestones, and decisions down the left column. For each task, assign a responsibility value to each role or person on the team. This sample RACI chart gives you a quick glimpse at how all the pieces and parts come together. Ready to make a RACI chart of your own?

You can create a lot of efficiencies using a RACI chart on your project. When you create a RACI at the beginning of a project, it can be useful to help set expectations for who is managing or responsible for work going forward. People involved in the project should be able to clearly see where they need to be involved, and with which tasks.

RACI Chart

Leadership Styles Directive vs Supportive

Directive leadership, also known as coercive leadership, is an ordering, autocratic leadership style where the leader gives orders and those orders are followed. Besides orders being followed, directive leaders also expect 100 percent compliance with rules and.

Supportive leadership is useful with a team that is new, inexperienced, or otherwise lacking confidence. Path–Goal theory assumes that leaders are flexible and that they can change their style, as situations require. The theory proposes two contingency variables, such as environment and employee characteristics,…

The Four Styles: The directive path-goal clarifying leader behavior refers to situations where the leader lets employees know what is expected of them and tells them how to perform their tasks. The theory argues that this behavior has the most positive effect when the employees’ role and task demands are ambiguous and intrinsically satisfying.

Leadership Styles Directive vs Supportive

Value Proposition Framework

The proposed framework focuses on a firm’s pre-emptive value offering (also known as a customer value proposition). This is a firm’s offering of the value it seeks to create for a customer, in order to meet his or her requirements.

A value proposition (VP) is a declarative statement that explains why a customer should purchase your product or service. The statement summarizes how you will deliver your brand promise and how your offering will deliver value to customers.

Ideally, a good value proposition model will help push your product closer towards product/market fit. Using a framework is meant to reveal potential knowledge gaps in about your customer, leading to parts of your product that won’t stick.

Value Proposition Framework

Journey Map Sample

Essentially, a customer journey map helps you visualize the whole process a customer goes through, from their initial touchpoint throughout their entire lifecycle as they strive to achieve a specific goal. The map shows where customers enter your marketing and sales cycle, then how they find success with your products or services.

What is Employee Journey Mapping? An employee journey map is a visualization of the timeline of the entire employee experience, starting when people consider applying for a position until they leave the company. It depicts all the key touchpoints along the way, while underscoring employee needs and pain points.

One of the best approaches to analyzing and improving employee experience is a technique called Customer Journey Mapping (CJM). If you are not familiar with customer journey mapping, there is a complete guide we wrote on the subject.

Journey Map Sample

Process Map Symbols

Process Mapping Symbols and Notation. Each element in a process map is represented by a specific symbol. Process symbols are also commonly called flowchart symbols, flowchart shapes or flow diagram symbols. These symbols come from the Unified Modeling Language or UML, which is an international standard for drawing process maps.

A basic process map would look like this; Each step in a process is represented by a shape in a process map. These shapes are also called flowchart shapes. There are nearly 30 standard shapes that you can use in process mapping. However, we think for most people, using a handful of the most common shapes will be easier to understand.

How to Create a Process Map| Process Mapping Steps
Identify the Process You Need to Map
Bring Together the Right Team
Gather All the Necessary Information
Organize the Steps in a Sequential Order
Draw the Baseline Process Map

Process Map Symbols

Bottleneck Analysis

Continuous Bottleneck Analysis With Kanban The key to a healthy and productive Flow is the absolute minimum interruption to the process. The work has to stream through it freely powered by the Pull power. Following the Lean management concept of continuous improvement, bottleneck analysis should also be an ongoing process.

What is Bottleneck Analysis? What is a Bottleneck (or Constraint)? In a manufacturing process, “bottleneck” refers to a work stage that cannot meet the production quota even at its maximum throughput capacity, thereby delaying or stopping the flow of operations. This concept equally applies to management and logistics.

When performing a full investigation on how to find the cause of these issues, a bottleneck analysis tool should always be used. In most cases, the tools used for this process are going to be either a written chart, or more likely, a computer program.

Bottleneck Analysis

Buyer Utility Map

Buyer utility map is a tool that help visualize the journey of the buyer against different criteria. It consists of two dimensions; the buyer experience cycle and the utility levers. You can easily see areas where the industry is focusing on and ignoring, which you can capitalize on. Buyer utility map thus helps company find its Blue Ocean strategy.

Maloneys Diffusion of Innovation

Maloney’s diffusion of innovation shows the innovation lifecycle. There are four main components that help spread innovation and include the innovation itself, communication methods time, and a social system.